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Figure 2.14 Typical oceanic section with associated depths and sound speeds in the water column and subbottom layers (Bryan, 1967).

Figure 2.14 Typical oceanic section with associated depths and sound speeds in the water column and subbottom layers (Bryan, 1967).

Figure 2.15 Idealized distribution of marine sediments. Hatched areas indicate inorganic pelagic and terrigenous sediments. Stippled areas denote organic pelagic sediments comprising calcareous and silicious oozes. (Adapted from Arrhenius, 1963; The Sea, Vol. 3, pp. 655-727; reprinted by permission of John Wiley & Sons, Inc., all rights reserved.)

sediments, 1-2 km of basement rock and 4-6 km of crustal rock overlying the upper mantle.

Major portions of the sea floor are covered with unconsolidated sediments with an average thickness of approximately 500 m. Sediments can be classified according to their origin as either terrigenous or pelagic, although no single classification scheme has universal approval. The general distribution of sediments according to Arrhenius (1963) is presented in Figure 2.15.

Sound speed Layer (kms-1)

Sound speed Layer (kms-1)

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