Optional Equipment For Scuba Operations

The requirements of a specific diving operation determine which items of optional diving equipment may be necessary. This section lists some of the equipment that may be used. Boots or hard-soled shoes Whistle Slate and pencil Tools and light Signal flare Tool bag Acoustic beacons Lines and floats Wrist compass Submersible cylinder pressure gauge Chem light and strobe light Protective Clothing. A diver needs some form of protection from cold water, from heat loss during long exposure in water...

Air Cylinders

Inspect air cylinder exteriors and valves for rust, cracks, dents, and any evidence of weakness. Verify that the reserve mechanism is closed (lever in up position) signifying a filled cylinder ready for use. Gauge the cylinders according to the following procedure 1. Attach pressure gauge to O-ring seal face of the on off valve. 2. Close gauge bleed valve and open air reserve mechanism (lever in down position). Slowly open the cylinder on off valve, keeping a cloth over the face of the gauge....

Oxygen Consumption Rate

Swim, 0.8 knot (average speed) (use for planning purposes, round up to 1.4) Figure 7-6. Oxygen Consumption and RMV at Different Work Rates. Va Capacity available, scf C Consumption rate, scfm Sample Problem. Determine the duration of the air supply of a diver doing moderate work at 70 fsw using twin 72-cubic-foot steel cylinders charged to 2,250 psig. 1. Calculate the diver's consumption rate in scfm. According to Figure 7-6, the diver's consumption rate at depth is 1.4 acfm. 2. Calculate the...

Water Entry And Descent

The divers are now ready to enter the water, where their scuba shall be given another brief inspection by their dive partners or tenders prior to descent. 7-6.1 Water Entry. There are several ways to enter the water, with the choice usually determined by the nature of the diving platform (Figure 7-8a and Figure 7-8b). Whenever possible, entry should be made by ladder, especially in unfamiliar waters. Several basic rules apply to all methods of entry Look before jumping or pushing off from the...

Minimum Equipment

The face mask protects the diver's eyes and nose from the water. Additionally, it provides maximum visibility by putting a layer of air between the diver's eyes and the water. Face masks are available in a variety of shapes and sizes for diver comfort. To check for proper fit, hold the mask in place with one hand and inhale gently through the nose. The suction produced should hold the mask in place. Don the mask with the head strap properly adjusted, and inhale gently through...

Equipment Authorized for Navy Use Only diving equipment that has been certi

Cylinders Markings

Fied or authorized for use by the NAVSEA 00C ANU list shall be used in a Navy dive. However, many items, such as hand tools, which are not specifically listed in the ANU list or do not fit under the scope of certification and are deemed valuable to the success of the dive, can be used. A current copy must be maintained by all diving activities. The ANU list can be found on the Internet at http 7-2.2 Open-Circuit Scuba. All open-circuit scuba authorized for Navy use employ a demand system that...

NOTE Paragraph 745 addresses safety precautions for charging and handling cylinders

Scuba cylinders shall be charged only with air that meets diving air purity standards. A diving unit can charge its own cylinders by one of two accepted methods 1 by cascading or transferring air from banks of large cylinders into the scuba tanks or 2 by using a high-pressure air compressor. Cascading is the fastest and most efficient method for charging scuba tanks. The NAVSEA 00C ANU list lists approved high-pressure compressors and equipment authorized for scuba air sources. The normal...