Operating In Currents And Fast Water

The adverse effects on divers operating in currents and fast water are numerous. The risk of entanglement, loss of primary air supply, and impact injuries while operating in fast water is high. This section outlines the potential hazards to diving, procedures to reduce risks, and considerations when planning combat diving operations in these conditions. 37. Table 2-2 illustrates current speeds in relation to diving techniques and equipment. Operating in currents exceeding these speeds may...

Disposition Of Combat Divers

The Land Force combat diving capability is resident in regular force engineer units. CFAO 43-2 Diving Organization, Responsibilities and Administrative Instructions outlines the establishment and organization of combat diving teams. 8. The Army Dive Centre. Mandated to develop combat diving doctrine, training, techniques, and procedures and is the focal point for all matters and policy issues concerning combat diving. 9. Combat Diving Safety. The most effective...

Recovery Of Equipment

Combat divers will be tasked to recover large high value items, such as an AFV or a bridge pontoon. The combat diver is not trained or equipped to search for objects smaller than weapons. Tasks that combat divers will conduct when recovering equipment are 5. Underwater Searches. Combat divers can conduct searches to locate, and conduct the subsequent recovery of, equipment and personnel. B-GG-380-000 FP-002, Canadian Forces Diving Manual, Volume 2, Compressed Air Breathing Apparatus details...

Equipment

C-27-834-000 NY-002 C-87-010-101 MS-003 C-87-011-004 MS-000 C-87-020-001 NG-001 Engineer Field Manual, Mines and Booby Traps, Engineers Allied Guide to Diving Medical Disorders Compressed Air Systems Part 17 Section 9 Operating and Maintenance Manual Diver's HP Air Compressor NSN 4310-21-8693745 (gasoline driven) NSN 431021-869-3746 (Electric-Motor Driven) Care, Inspection and Testing of Aluminium Diving Cylinders Divers Breathing Air Compressor Lubricating Oils Special Test Instructions...

BCompressed Air Breathing Apparatus CABA

CABA is the normal means of underwater operation. The equipment is normally held centrally within the units in the dive stores. While it is possible, under some circumstances, to detect CABA divers in still water, the CABA also allows the divers to swim deeper to avoid detection. If the enemy threat is too high, then suppressive fire or obscuration must be provided to support the mission. Combat divers with breathing apparatus can conduct tasks within their depth limitation, no decompression...

Helicopter Transportation

The use of helicopters is a viable mode of transport when speed of deployment is essential. The helicopter will normally be used to transport a dive team to a dive site because of the urgency of the task or the difficulty in getting the section vehicle across the area of operations. The helicopter is rarely, if ever, required for casting and recovery of divers. Divers are employed to support the manoeuvre of the army therefore they are employed where the army must be able to move and...

Gapcrossing Operations

Typical gap-crossing operations are d. vehicle and personnel fording and 3. Combat divers may be employed during the conduct of all stages of a gap-crossing operation. Typical tasks they may be required to perform when supporting the in-place and bridgehead forces are a. conduct reconnaissance of the potential crossing sites, especially the bottom profile and far bank b. breach obstacles in the water and on the far bank, including mined areas c. mark exit points and any obstacles in the water...

Cold Weather Operations

This section details factors that affect or should be considered when planning combat diving operations in cold weather conditions. This information is not restricted to through-the-ice dives (which are rare or non-existent in operational theatres) but also applies to dives in near zero temperatures on open water. Some sustainment engineering dive tasks may require ice dives. B-GG-380-000 FP-002, Canadian Forces Diving Manual, Volume 2, Compressed Air Breathing Apparatus details standard...

Underwater Obstacle Breaching

In support of a gap-crossing operation, there may be a requirement for combat divers to breach complex obstacles at or below the water line for the assault echelon. The reconnaissance will identify the nature, type, size, and number of obstacles. The reconnaissance party should be prepared to mark submerged obstacles and mines with the use of chem-lites or similar items secured to or near the target or mine. Such markings might give away proposed crossing sites if there is any delay between...

Underwater Tools and Construction Equipment

Generally, all hand tools can be used underwater. Special consideration must be taken in regard to securing them to the diver task site and their post-dive maintenance. Combat divers may use tools and equipment that are powered by hydraulics, low- and high-pressure air, or ignition of gases a. Hydraulic Tools. Hydraulic tools provide consistent power, are generally safer to use, have little or no depth limitations, are generally lighter per unit power output, do not produce bubbles that obscure...

Dive Preliminary Course

Potential candidates must meet the selection criteria stated in A-PD-055-003 PQ-001 OSS AFEP or ADUV, including completion of a pressure tolerance test. This is the minimum requirement and could suffice to send a fit soldier or officer on the course if there are not enough candidates. Commanding officers have the prerogative to nominate candidates without the completion of diver preliminary training and selection. Generally, a preliminary course is conducted at the unit level over a...

Combat Diving Administration Equipment And Stores

Administrative procedures for combat diving are detailed in B-GG-380-000 FP-002, Canadian Forces Diving Manual, Volume 2, Compressed Air Breathing Apparatus. Annex A outlines additional references relevant to combat divers. 27. Unit Dive Stores Facility. The facility provided for dive stores within unit lines should offer adequate space and security. In addition, it should offer the following a. Section stores area for stores and equipment not on personal charge and...

Minefield Breaching

Combat divers may be required to breach mined areas in the water and on the exit areas in support of a gap-crossing operation. As detailed in Section 3, all obstacles are considered mined however, there may be sections of rivers and fording or bridge sites that are mined with no other artificial obstacles. 21. It is not feasible for combat divers to neutralize and disarm submerged mines. These are limitations caused by the lack of visibility, manual dexterity, and the physical difficulties...

Selecting Swimming Or Diving Technique

Combat divers are required to swim for extended periods of time and distances. In addition to their breathing apparatus, they often carry or tow equipment and stores to conduct tasks. They may often incorporate a combination of swimming while submerged and surface swimming. This section details characteristics and factors relevant to swimming on or beneath the surface. 6. Swimming Beneath the Surface. The use of underwater breathing apparatus allows a combat diver to approach an objective...